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  • Possible Cause And Cure

    I THINK THIS IS REALLY INTERESTING.
    WHAT DO YOU THINK?

    VEINOUS PELVIC CONJESTION:

    http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/press...RCH/980313.HTM

    March 13, 1998
    MEDIA CONTACT: Marc Kusinitz
    PHONE: (410) 955-8665
    E-MAIL: [email protected]

    Non-Surgical Treatment Ends Pelvic Pain In Women
    Pelvic congestive syndrome, a painful disorder in women, which often goes undiagnosed and untreated, can usually be cured by plugging blood vessels in the ovaries, according to a study by a Johns Hopkins radiologist.

    The treatment offers hope to the estimated 15 percent of women 20 to 40 years old with the condition, which is caused by varicose veins in the ovaries, says Anthony Venbrux, M.D., director of interventional radiology. The bad veins cause blood to pool in the ovaries and pelvis, leading to sometimes crippling pain during and after sexual intercourse, especially before or during menstruation.

    A minimally invasive treatment that shuts down veins and eliminates blood pooling, the technique relieved pain in 9 of 11 women treated at Hopkins and Tripler Army Medical Center in Hawaii.

    Venbrux reported results of this study at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, Tuesday, March 3.

    "Most of the women I see are at the end of their rope," says Venbrux. "They've become dependent on narcotics to ease the pain, and had multiple surgeries and psychiatric treatment. And their sex lives are significantly disrupted."

    The problem is made worse in part because many doctors are unfamiliar with the condition and fail to diagnose it, according to Venbrux, and a fourth of those undiagnosed women undergo unneeded hysterectomy--removal of the uterus--which rarely solves the problem.

    To detect pelvic congestion syndrome, radiologists first insert a catheter into a vein in the neck, groin or arm and guide it to the pelvis. A fluid is injected to make the veins in the pelvis visible on X-ray. If the X-ray shows very tightly coiled veins, tiny coils or glue-like liquids are introduced through the catheter, plugging the veins. The procedure, which takes less than two hours, requires light anesthesia and generally does not require hospitalization, says Venbrux.

    Other authors of the paper include Anthony Eclavea, Paul R. Cordts and James Buckley (Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii).

  • #2
    Very Interesting! Now I wish I had not had my hysterectomy as dealing with the hormone replacement therapy has been awful! -Vicki
    Blessings and Hope

    Current Meds.
    OFF MY MEDS
    Vivelle Dot: .10 changed every 72 hours
    Compoounded Progesterone 25mg/night

    Current Supplements
    Hydroeye: 2 pills AM

    Diagnosed
    1995: Endometriosis
    1998: Interstitial Cystitis
    2006: Bladder Endometriosis, Total Hysterectomy and Bowel Re-Section
    2008: Removal of Ovarian Remnant and Endometrial Cyst That was Obstructing Ureter
    2012: Laparoscopic Removal of Adhesions and Staples

    Comment


    • #3
      I just wish there could be something that simple to help interstitial cystitis!

      Donna
      Stay safe


      Elmiron Eye Disease Information Center - https://www.ic-network.com/elmiron-p...mation-center/
      Elmiron Eye Disease Fact Sheet (Downloadable) - https://www.ic-network.com/wp-conten...nFactSheet.pdf

      Have you checked the ICN Shop?
      Click on ICN Shop at the top of this page. You'll find Bladder Builder and Bladder Rest, both of which we are finding have excellent results.

      Patient Help: http://www.ic-network.com/patientlinks.html

      Sub-types https://www.ic-network.com/five-pote...markably-well/

      Diet list: https://www.ic-network.com/interstitial-cystitis-diet/

      AUA Guidelines: https://www.ic-network.com/aua-guide...tial-cystitis/

      I am not a medical authority nor do I offer medical advice. In all cases, I strongly encourage you to discuss your medical treatment with your personal medical care provider. Only they can, and should, give medical recommendations to you.
      [3MG]

      Anyone who says something is foolproof hasn't met a determined fool

      Comment


      • #4
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q...=pubmed_docsum

        Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2005 Jun 11;149(24):1364-5.
        [Women with pelvic complaints and atypical varicose veins, varicose veins of the vulva and insufficiency of the pelvic veins; treatment with embolisation][Article in Dutch]
        van der Plas LG, van Vliet A, Bousema MT, Sanders CJ, Mali WP.
        Universitair Medisch Centrum Utrecht, Utrecht. [email protected]

        In three women, aged 34, 52 and 30 years, respectively, who suffered from chronic pelvic symptoms such as a heavy feeling and abdominal pain, atypical varicose veins were observed on the medial side of the upper thighs together with varicose veins of the vulva; these are indicators of insufficiency of the pelvic veins. The symptoms were reduced following embolisation of the insufficient pelvic veins. These symptoms are also known as the pelvic congestive syndrome. The exact correlation between insufficiency of the pelvic veins and the complaints mentioned above has not yet been determined, but it seems that in most patients the symptoms diminish or disappear following embolisation of the insufficient pelvic veins. When patients complain of chronic pelvic pain of unknown aetiology, one should look for atypical varices and vulval varices and consider pelvic-vein insufficiency as a possible cause.
        [/QUOTE]

        Comment


        • #5
          This forum is isolated,can we move it up the list?

          Comment


          • #6
            I have been thinking about this thread a lot. You know some women do well on Heparin injections which thins the blood. Elmiron is also a blood thinner. I have been taking a product called hydroeye which is for dry eyes but I swear it has helped my IC. On the back of the bottle it says it has vitamin e and should not be used with blood thinners.
            I thought I would add that this original study was done in 1998. -Vicki
            Blessings and Hope

            Current Meds.
            OFF MY MEDS
            Vivelle Dot: .10 changed every 72 hours
            Compoounded Progesterone 25mg/night

            Current Supplements
            Hydroeye: 2 pills AM

            Diagnosed
            1995: Endometriosis
            1998: Interstitial Cystitis
            2006: Bladder Endometriosis, Total Hysterectomy and Bowel Re-Section
            2008: Removal of Ovarian Remnant and Endometrial Cyst That was Obstructing Ureter
            2012: Laparoscopic Removal of Adhesions and Staples

            Comment


            • #7
              Interesting

              I think its interesting, however I would want to read a little more about the women in the study as I find it almost too, too wonderful that all of them were helped? This is not usual. I also wonder about how the nerve damage component is helped or hurt by this idea?
              Interesting to follow this as more studies are done.
              Sammi

              Sammi

              Meds: Melatonin 3mg @ bedtime if needed. Estrogen 1.5 mg troche and 0.1 mg Estrace cream.
              Diagnosis: IC, PFD (both in remission)

              Comment


              • #8
                http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/q..._uids=16517774

                J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2006 Feb;17(2 Pt 1):289-97. Links
                Embolotherapy for pelvic congestion syndrome: long-term results.Kim HS, Malhotra AD, Rowe PC, Lee JM, Venbrux AC.
                Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21287-4010, USA. [email protected]

                PURPOSE: To evaluate the long-term clinical outcome of transcatheter embolotherapy in women with chronic pelvic pain caused by ovarian and pelvic varices. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population included consecutive patients referred to a tertiary-care interventional radiology service from 1998 to 2003 because of a high degree of clinical suspicion of pelvic and ovarian varices. Visual analog scales and questionnaires during clinic visits were used to measure pain perception levels. Basal female hormonal levels were obtained and compared. RESULTS: Of 131 patients referred (mean age, 34.0 years+/-12.5), percutaneous transfemoral venography confirmed the presence of ovarian varices in 127 (97.0%), all of whom were treated with embolotherapy. Internal iliac embolotherapy was performed in 108 of 127 patients (85.0%). Ninety-seven patients completed long-term clinical follow-up (mean 45 months+/-18). The mean pelvic pain level had improved significantly from 7.6+/-1.8 before embolotherapy to 2.9+/-2.8 after embolotherapy (P<.0001). Significant improvement in each category of specific symptoms was also noted (P<.0001). Overall, 83% of the patients exhibited clinical improvement at long-term follow-up, 13% had no significant change, and 4% exhibited worsened condition. No significant change was noted in hormone levels after embolotherapy. Two successful pregnancies were noted after ovarian and pelvic vein embolotherapy. CONCLUSION: Direct venographic evaluation with embolotherapy can achieve significant improvement in pain perception levels in patients with chronic pelvic pain caused by pelvic venous congestion.

                Comment

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