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Interesting article about autoimmune diseases and pregnancy remission

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  • needsrelief
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    purpleviolet-I hear that nursing women with IC may also go into remission if they havent already. I flare during PMS but Im better during my period. I sure hope this is the case. I need a lil break from IC.

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  • purpleviolet
    replied
    I did not go into remission but oddly enough it was the beginning trimester when I think I felt the worst. I wish I had kept a log because this was awhile ago. Nursing was probably the best time for IC but I never was really in remission just more even. It would be interesting to see if the Ic'ers who flare during PMS get better if pregnant.

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  • needsrelief
    replied
    Hi, I dont know where they get the statistics from but there is an interview on the ICN with Dr. Parsons and I think he mentioned the 80% too. I think its possible that my old uro and Dr Parsons may have worked together maybe in research. cause there offices are very close to each other. I dont know its just a guess. but 50/50 sounds more accurate to me personally. but I was just going off of what my doctor told me.

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  • pj77
    replied
    Interesting information, thank you for posting.

    I do question where they get that 80% statistic from? My urologist told me it was a 50/50 chance. And I have heard from other people on the board a lot of different numbers thrown out by their doctors.

    You know what they say about statistics 89.99% of statistics are made up on the spot. (sorry, bad joke)

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  • needsrelief
    replied
    Im TTC this year. I hope that Im of the many women that goes into remission. I would value that time greatly.

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  • flowerangela
    replied
    hope this is true. remission during pregnancy would be awesome especially since hormones would be all over the place.relief from ic and allergies would be a godsend.. too bad u have to put up with a child for 18+ years for this to happen LOL

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  • darlene
    replied
    Interesting! I have inflammatory bowel disease, psoriasis and had pre eclampsia during my pregnancy.

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  • Julie B
    replied
    That is interesting because I just told my daughter this. She has endometriosis and terrible allergies (ended up in ER this weekend.) If she can possibly get pregnant, I assured her that her allergies would be less, at least for the pregnancy. That was my experience anyway.

    Thanks for sharing!

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  • Interesting article about autoimmune diseases and pregnancy remission

    I was told by my urologist 2 years ago that 80% of pregnant women with IC go into remission at some point during their pregnancy. Now whether IC is an auto-immune disease or not is still debatable. I believe that in my case it is auto-immune. I have IC, IBS, and Fibromyalgia. I was in a classroom lecture and a speaker came to discuss Mutiple Sclerosis and she said that many women with multiple sclerosis go into remission during pregnancy and MS is also an auto-immune disease. Here is the article I found on the web. I hope that you enjoy:

    A biological mechanism that affects the immune system is what makes many women experience remission of autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and uveitis during pregnancy, revealed a study.

    The expression of an enzyme known as pyruvate kinase is reduced in immune cells in pregnant women compared to non-pregnant women, according to Dr. Howard R. Petty, biophysicist at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center and Dr. Roberto Romero, of the National Institutes for Health.

    The study also reports that expression of the enzyme is lower in pregnant women compared to those with pre-eclampsia, a condition with inflammatory components.

    The study is significant because the newly discovered mechanism points to a pathway that could be targeted for treatment.

    “It may be possible to design drugs that mildly suppress pyruvate kinase activity as a means of replicating the immune status of normal pregnancy,” said Petty.

    In addition to pre-eclampsia, he believes that rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, and uveitis may eventually yield to similarly designed drugs.

    In his search to explain the phenomenon, Petty knew to look for a metabolic pathway or mechanism with two characteristics—it had to “dial down” the intensity of the normal immune response, an action needed so that a pregnant woman does not reject the foetus, which has proteins from the father that are “foreign” to the mother. At the same time, such a mechanism must support cell growth needed by the developing foetus.

    The activity of the enzyme pyruvate kinase—and and its product, pyruvate—fills both roles: promoting cell growth while modifying the immune response.

    Because pyruvate kinase activity is depressed during pregnancy, cell metabolism supports an increased production of lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, and other substances that support cell growth.

    Petty explains that our normal robust immune response depends upon pyruvate to promote calcium signalling, which, in turn, stimulates the production of messenger molecules called cytokines.

    When pyruvate is decreased during pregnancy, calcium signalling is also reduced, and the immune response is different than that in non-pregnant individuals.

    “Modification of signalling along this pathway allows the pregnant woman to maintain an immune response, but at a level that will not harm the foetus,” said Petty,

    The study included 21 women in their third trimester of a normal pregnancy, 25 women with pre-eclampsia, and a control group of non-pregnant women.

    The researchers used a variety of methods to confirm their findings, including fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, which are used to study cell signaling.

    The higher levels of the enzyme seen in women with pre-eclampsia bolster the study’s findings, said Petty.

    “Pre-eclampsia has features of inflammatory disease. If you don’t reduce these pyruvate levels, you heighten inflammatory disease,” he added.

    Petty is hopeful that one day enzyme levels could be tested early in pregnancy to predict the likelihood of developing pre-eclampsia or other complications.

    The study appears online ahead of print in the August issue of the American Journal of Reproductive Immunology.
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