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Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy For Pelvic Pain

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  • bob04951
    replied
    Bob has to be on pure oxygen due to his COPD, and it does nothing for his IC symptoms. So...would wonder if the pressure from the chamber hurts more than helps.

    Sure you have all seen this site emedicine.medscape.com there is some interesting stuff on there as well, it was just updated in Feb 2011. Amazing, yay, they contribute diet as one of the top factors of bad symptoms. Maybe some of the docs who don't believe this will read it. And have a pretty good section on mast cells and mucosal mast cells. Also did a study on what/when started your IC, most had some type of trauma, whether it was accident, surgery, hernia or a cerebrovascular incident. (Jeeze, Bob has had all). They also contribute depression as a cause. It's a lot of reading, and still inconclusive, but it sounds like maybe we're getting somewhere. Maybe. Hopefully. And they also recognize children. There are just some interesting statistics there. Take care all.

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  • sshannon74074
    replied
    This is very interesting but....I'm wondering why a hyperbaric chamber is needed if all they are talking about is raising the oxygen percentage in the blood because you can do this by breathing from a compressed gas cylinder that has a higher oxygen percentage. Scuba divers do this all the time because normal air has oxygen percentage of 20.9% and the rest mosty nitrogen and when you go under water the gas in the tank compresses due to the increased pressure of being under water and the nitrogen component of the gas has the tendency to buildup in the blood and cause nitrogen narcosis. Nitrox which is a special blend to combat this nitrogen buildup has a higher percentage of oxygen (35%) and allows scuba divers to stay underwater longer and without adverse effects.

    What I'm wondering is why spend lots of money on treatments sitting around in a chamber when you can enjoy spending a lot less money scuba diving with Nitrox?

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  • bob04951
    replied
    This is very interesting. If they use them to treat deep sea divers who come up with the bends, you would think it may help any type of pelvic pain. Sure we'll all be researching this. Thanks for the info Jill

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  • Snowden1
    replied
    I thought about this immediately after getting IC. I felt like I had an internal burn and knew these hyperbaric oxygen chambers were being used successfully for burns and other issues. Also, the week before I developed what I explain as "the pain/burn going into my bladder" my bloodwork was fine. Then the week after my bloodwork showed high red blood cells and some other areas that when I looked it up shows up like an internal burn. Unfortunately, I ask about the hyperbaric oxygen chamber when I was doing PT (they had one there). No doctor would approve me to use it. I don't understand because if I am correct it is even being used for autism now. Why not let us try it??? There are so many other things that have been so much worse and invasive.

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  • purpleviolet
    replied
    availability of HOT

    I tried this but my ears could not take it, but most people can. I went to a naturopath in Seattle that has a small chamber that you have to wear a mask in. In the large ones in the hospital I think the pressure is all around you and you just sit in it but you never could get into one for IC, as it is considered experimental for that. Unfortunately I have bad ears - they always felt the pressure in an airplane, so in the chamber when the pressure was increased my ears really started to feel very strange and hurt and got red inside. But I saw plenty of other people young and old go in it and they were fine. This naturopath was a very experimental type of guy, he was charging me $1000 for 10 sessions (no insurance though). I have a credit with him now for other treatments if I want, but haven't figured out what the other treatments would be. ( I did try self-instilling ozone gas from him but that was horrible and VERY experimental - not recommended even though some alternative doctor claims it cures IC - NOPE!). My poor body!

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  • aleet7
    replied
    Wow...this sounds very interesting! I wonder when this will make it to the US? Some of us would be willing to try most anything to get relief! Thanks Jill for sharing this with us!

    Aleet7

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  • icnmgrjill
    started a topic Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy For Pelvic Pain

    Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy For Pelvic Pain

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has been studied for some time for IC, primarily in Germany if I remember correctly. Here's an interesting reference to a paper in Italy! - Jill


    The use of the hyperbaric oxygenation therapy in urology - Abstract
    Thursday, 03 March 2011

    Department of Urology, Misericordia Hospital, Grosseto, Italy.

    The basic principle of the hyperbaric oxygenation therapy (HOT) is to increase the dissolved oxygen in the blood when it is administered at high pressure. Then O2 will be distributed to the tissues through the pressure gradient, in this way obtaining an hyper-oxygenation of the tissue that has anti-inflammatory and pain-killing effects and induces augmentation of bacterial permeability to the antibiotics, neo-angiogenesis, enhancement of lymphocytes and macrophages function, augmentation of the testosterone secretion (in male), and healing of wound. These positive effects can be used in urology in several conditions: Scroto-perineal fascitis; Radiation-induced cystitis (and proctitis); Interstitial cystitis (urgency-frequency syndrome); Chronic pelvic pain. Our experience and the specific literature on this subject, suggest that HOT, sometimes associated with other medical and surgical therapies, can be a useful tool for treating such urologic diseases; in some cases this use is codified (Fournier's gangrene and Radiation-induced cystitis) in others (urgency-frequency syndrome and chronic pelvic pain) it represents a promising technique and needs further research.

    Reference: Arch Ital Urol Androl. 2010 Dec;82(4):173-6.
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