Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

IBS now linked to bacterial overgrowth in the gut

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • LithEruiel
    replied
    You're welcome! I've been on it 6 weeks and a I better. It's going to take time I guess to get my normal flora back. I was having a lot of diarrhea, but I'm not now, but still have the pain. Nice to get rid of that though!!

    Leave a comment:


  • tpronti
    replied
    Thanks so much for letting me know. How are you feeling?

    Leave a comment:


  • tpronti
    replied
    My gastro just prescibed Align? He told me it is very good for IBS. I just wanted to know if anyone has had a problem with it?

    Leave a comment:


  • LithEruiel
    replied
    I take Align and it doesn't seem to bother me. It takes a few weeks to notice a difference. I take it because I've been on a lot of antibiotics and have had a lot if stomach pain.

    Leave a comment:


  • tpronti
    replied
    My gastro just prescibed Align? He told me it is very good for IBS. I just wanted to know if anyone has had a problem with it?

    Leave a comment:


  • earthlady
    replied
    Yes, it's scary to think about it really. There is an environmental medical doctor in my area who deals with this but I've been too afraid to go and see him. I think I would be shocked to hear what's really out there even though I'm aware of a lot of the things that are.

    Leave a comment:


  • Engtch29
    replied
    So much more discovering to do...

    So, now they have linked a bacterial connection to IBS, among other things. I agree with Earthlady: It seems that so much of our enviroment is contaminated--so much that people really don't want to admit it because it's so scary: food, air, water, etc.

    That's why I'm beginning a body cleanse, starting with colon hydro-therapy, next I am targeting parasites and my liver/gall bladder. For the past 10 years of my life, I have done nothing but toxify my body with fast food, alcohol and cigarettes (on occassion), and just living in such a toxic world.

    I am seeing a local MD who utilizes alternative methods of practice also, so I am not taking these treatments in to my own hands.

    Get well, everyone.

    Leave a comment:


  • earthlady
    replied
    I'm wondering how much of everyone's IBS is caused by just plain food contamination. There are so many food recalls of everything from ground turkey to spinach and the latest one with the ground turkey was a biggie. I ended up in the ER twice in three months with something they never could identify, but just said most probably food contamination poisoning.

    Leave a comment:


  • LithEruiel
    replied
    eh...I'm on antibiotics a lot (for respiratory infections) and they have made my symptoms worse...I've had IBS since I was a kid. Right now they've wiped out pretty much all of my bacteria (I'm on on probiotic) and it's tearing me up...

    Leave a comment:


  • KathiB
    replied
    This is really interesting. My gastro doctor believes I have SIBO. I have been on rifaximin, which is a really, really expensive antibiotic that just treats the gut, 3 times and will soon be starting my fourth time. My gastro says some people have to take this antibiotic 1 week out of every month to keep their IBS in check. Since I am having diarrhea 4-10 times on an average day, I am willing to try anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • flowerangela
    replied
    very interesting.

    Leave a comment:


  • polygon
    replied
    "Of those patients with IBS, 37.5 percent were positive for bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine, compared to fewer than 10 percent of those who did not have the disorder."
    Interesting.

    I'm also interested in all the different bacteria strains they found in large amounts - are they the bacteria we normally have in our systems, just in large quantities, or is it a build-up of foreign bacteria (which would make sense for military personnel going overseas.)
    Maybe we're lacking some key element that would otherwise keep the level of bacteria in check...

    Thanks for the news, I really hope this means that more research will be done!

    Leave a comment:


  • icnmgrjill
    started a topic IBS now linked to bacterial overgrowth in the gut

    IBS now linked to bacterial overgrowth in the gut

    For those of us with IBS, this research intrigues!!! I wish I could go back to my childhood and figure out if and/or when I was struck with an intestinal illness. I know it happened ALOT. But, I also find the connection with active duty military serving overseas to be fascinating. I think that exposure to bacteria not found in our normal environment is clearly a factor which would explain why every time I travel abroad, I almost always develop a gut problem. Europe, Hawaii... it happens every time.. and travelling to India or China is terrifying. The last think I want is a mega case of delhi belly! - Jill

    Research Deepens Understanding of Most Common Gastrointestinal Disorder in U.S., Linking It to Bacterial Overgrowth, Food Poisoning
    Released: 5/10/2011 6:00 PM EDT
    Source: Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

    Newswise — LOS ANGELES (May 10, 2011) – Cedars-Sinai researchers have reported two advances in the understanding of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States, affecting an estimated 30 million people.

    One study provides further evidence that IBS is linked to an overgrowth of bacteria in the gut. In a separate study, a mathematical model reveals the disease’s link to food poisoning and shows that military personnel are at a much higher risk for the disorder than the rest of the population.

    “The better we understand this disease, which affects millions of Americans, the more tools we will have for fighting it,” said Mark Pimentel, MD, director of the Cedars-Sinai GI Motility Program and a primary investigator on the studies. “Patients with this condition suffer serious quality of life issues. It’s a disease that is frequently misunderstood and difficult for people to talk about, but it’s important for the medical community to understand the causes of the disease so we can develop the most effective treatments possible.”

    The findings were reported at Digestive Disease Week, the world’s largest gathering of physicians and researchers in gastroenterology, hepatology, endoscopy and gastrointestinal surgery. The May 7-10 conference occurred in Chicago. IBS is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the United States, affecting more than 20 percent of the population. Doctors commonly categorize patients with a “constipation predominant” condition, a “diarrhea-predominant” condition, or an alternating pattern of diarrhea and constipation. These patients also often experience abdominal pain or cramps, excess gas or bloating, and visible abdominal distension.

    In collaboration with researchers at Sismanogleion General Hospital in Athens, Greece, and at the University of Athens, scientists looked at small bowel cultures to confirm the presence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth – or SIBO – in patients with IBS. Previous studies have indicated that bacteria have a role in the disease, including breath tests finding methane (a byproduct of bacterial fermentation in the gut), as well as the disease responding to antibiotics. In this study, 320 patients underwent an endoscopy of their upper GI tract, from which a small bowel culture was cultivated. Of those patients with IBS, 37.5 percent were positive for bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine, compared to fewer than 10 percent of those who did not have the disorder . The overgrowth was more prevalent in those with the diarrhea-predominant version of the disease.

    Researchers also found more different kinds of bacteria in IBS patients.
    In a separate study, using a mathematical model, researchers concluded that food poisoning – gastroenteritis – may account for the majority of irritable bowel syndrome cases. Further, it predicts a greater incidence of the disease for populations at a higher risk of these kinds of infections, such as military personnel. The study was based on data from the Centers for Disease Control and other research studies. The model projects that 9 percent of those with a genetic predisposition would contract IBS after 10 years. However, among high risk groups such as deployed military, 9 percent of that population would develop the disease in a six month time frame.

    “While everyone understands that our troops encounter great danger and difficult conditions while serving their country, this study reminds us that we need to pay greater attention to the dietary woes and digestive upsets that long have been the subject of wry discussion among overseas forces,” Pimentel said of the study results.
Working...
X