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Uropathogenic Escherichia coli induces chronic pelvic pain

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  • flowerangela
    replied
    I just reread this post and am dealing with a real uti at the moment.
    It's reaffirming my opinion heredity And bacteria or infections have alot to do with the cause of ic

    Leave a comment:


  • nottoc4
    replied
    I think my IC started after a really bad UTI, too. It felt like the UTI never cleared up (I was recultured after the course of meds was over with and it was negative. I would get a UTI every few months and then other symptoms appeared and finally a diagnosis of IC.

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  • needsrelief
    replied
    My IC/Pelvic pain also started after a uti. I hope that they come up with a treatment since they found something that maybe an etiology in some IC cases.

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  • flowerangela
    replied
    interesting. my pelvic pain stayed after a horrible bacterial uti and we could never turn it off even after the infection was out of my system. looking forward to hearing all the new and fascinating research sounds like we're gettin closer to a cure everyday

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  • Uropathogenic Escherichia coli induces chronic pelvic pain

    Researchers in Chicago hypothesized that certain strains of bacteria appear to trigger a pain response.. that appears to persist even AFTER the infection is gone. The research below proves that one strain of ECOLI (strain CP1) appears to do just that, though only in some but not all of the mice tested. Thus, we have evidence an infection might be the triggering event to a pelvic pain syndrome though heredity also plays a role. Fascinating but much more research is needed.. specifically how to turn the pain off after it happens. - Jill

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is a debilitating syndrome of unknown etiology often postulated, but not proven, to be associated with microbial infection of the prostate gland. We hypothesized that infection of the prostate by clinically relevant uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) can initiate and establish chronic pain. We utilized an E. coli strain newly isolated from a patient with CP/CPPS (strain CP1) and examined its molecular pathogenesis in cell culture and in a murine model of bacterial prostatitis. We found that CP1 is an atypical isolate distinct from most UPEC in its phylotype and virulence factor profile. CP1 adhered to, invaded, and proliferated within prostate epithelia and colonized the prostate and bladder of NOD and C57BL/6J mice. Using behavioral measures of pelvic pain, we showed that CP1 induced and sustained chronic pelvic pain in NOD mice, an attribute not exhibited by a clinical cystitis strain. Furthermore, pain was observed to persist even after bacterial clearance from genitourinary tissues. CP1 induced pelvic pain behavior exclusively in NOD mice and not in C57BL/6J mice, despite comparable levels of colonization and inflammation. Microbial infections can thus serve as initiating agents for chronic pelvic pain through mechanisms that are dependent on both the virulence of the bacterial strain and the genetic background of the host.

    Source: Rudick CN et al. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli induces chronic pelvic pain. Infect Immun. 2011 Feb;79(2):628-35.
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