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  • Goin back to school

    Well..I'm in a paradigm shift...the positive way to say life has handed you crap and it's time to do something with it. Been teaching special ed for 10 years...tough kids..multiply disabled, autisitic, violent...yaddah, etc..Have my Master's in this...So..my doc tells me a couple months ago..(right before my big pout) that I would not be able to ever work with those guys agaiin. I don't handle change welll and this was huge change in my personal view of myself. I always felt I would be going back to my classroom. So, I cried and went into a very deep depression.

    Then I had a vision..a dream...and a coincidence the next day. My dream consisted of working with visually impaired kids, and the next day I ran into a woman who had been a consultant with me in vision impairment. She is now an administrator in an outreach program with the state school for the blind. She wants me to work for her, even for 15-20 hours a week!!! I just have to update my cert in the next year, over the internet and with some kids during a student teaching internship in the spring next year. I am JAZZED. She wants me and it would be very flexible. I'm very excited. I can take breaks when I need to,work when I can, and learn some new skills. Now, I just need to figure out how to get off some of these meds so I can drive!! lmao


    Alrighty then...love yall...take care
    T
    I.C. DX'd following my "second hysterectomy" (the remaining ovary, that kept bursting and bleeding 2 years after my hyster/right oompherectomy, was removed in 2003. I was a special ed teacher. I am now very lost, and feeling rather hopeless in my life.

    Medications I CURRENTLY take:
    90 mgs Ms contin (45 mgs Am/PM)
    Percocet as needed
    Topomax 100mg day
    Ambien 10 mg bed
    desipramine 25 mgs




    If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed.
    Albert Einstein

  • #2
    T,
    That's great news! I'm a teacher too and after being diagnosed last year and having a tough time keeping up the pace as a first grade teacher I was able to land another position offering a bit more flexibility. I'm training as I teach Reading Recovery, a 20 week intense program working with strugling readers in first grade. It's still full time and requires a grad class to get certified but because I don't have a class anymore when I'm out I don't have to plan for a sub. I have been out with med. leave for 3 weeks and while I know my kids need me and am anxious to get back I am not as stressed as I was when I had a class.

    I'm fortunate to have an understanding principal and my Reading Recovery trainer has been as well. She has a very strict attendance policy for the class and basically expects you there unless your on your death bed. I called her again last week to let her know that while I was not back at school yet I might be able to sit in class for the 3 hours if I took my morphine and had someone drive me there. She told me absolutely not, that I was to not worry about the class until I was well. She assured me that she is confident in my ability as a teacher and that even with the absences I would get my certification. I may observe some teachers this summer to officially make up the time. It was a load off of my shoulders. She knows that I have made an effort and have come to class and taught my student in front of the class even though I was in terrible pain. I'm very fortunate to have understanding people around me. I can't afford to lose my job becuase I have to have the insurance.

    Anyway, I'm thrilled for you! I'm sure you will love being able to work with kids but yet have the flexibility to take it easy when you need it.

    Congratulations! hi

    Rachel

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the positive story. I have the option to not do anything, and just sit on my butt and collect disability but I can't do that. I'm going bananas, If have some tools I figure I can fight some days through the pain. Most of the course is distance learning anyway. So, I can work in my jammies...its just this first term is going to be hell. We have to be on campus so we can "bond" as a cohort. I only have totake 9 credit hours(quarter) but the other 15 (they have to take survey of exceptional child and behavior management.....) I'm going to see about geting a special parking sticker because downtown Portland is becoming a major ***** to park in and I've woundup walking 7 blocks to appointments on campus the last couple of weeks and almost died.....(It hurted....plus it was just damn cold) Maybe by Fall I won't needone. Just for Summer.

      Anyway...Take care...


      Tracey
      I.C. DX'd following my "second hysterectomy" (the remaining ovary, that kept bursting and bleeding 2 years after my hyster/right oompherectomy, was removed in 2003. I was a special ed teacher. I am now very lost, and feeling rather hopeless in my life.

      Medications I CURRENTLY take:
      90 mgs Ms contin (45 mgs Am/PM)
      Percocet as needed
      Topomax 100mg day
      Ambien 10 mg bed
      desipramine 25 mgs




      If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed.
      Albert Einstein

      Comment


      • #4
        It sounds very much like you are making some really good moves. And you shouldn't have any problem getting the parking permit. In Oregon all you need to do is pick up a form from the Motor Vehicle Division and have your doctor sign the form.

        Sending an encouraging hug,
        Donna
        Stay safe

        Have you checked the ICN Shop?
        Click on ICN Shop at the top of this page. You'll find Bladder Builder and Bladder Rest, both of which we are finding have excellent results.

        Patient Help: http://www.ic-network.com/patientlinks.html

        Sub-types https://www.ic-network.com/five-pote...markably-well/

        Diet list: https://www.ic-network.com/interstitial-cystitis-diet/

        AUA Guidelines: https://www.ic-network.com/aua-guide...tial-cystitis/

        I am not a medical authority nor do I offer medical advice. In all cases, I strongly encourage you to discuss your medical treatment with your personal medical care provider. Only they can, and should, give medical recommendations to you.
        [3MG]

        Anyone who says something is foolproof hasn't met a determined fool

        Comment


        • #5
          That's great news MakingIt,

          I'm a teacher too, something I never thought I would be able to do with IC, but after I took care of ME, I was able to go back to university, finish school, and now I'm able to teach! I love it!! I teach elementary school. Isn't it a great profession??

          Congrats,
          Alexa
          My story of healing and hope http://www.ic-network.com/patientstories/alexa.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Wow..Alexa...how do you manage the need to pee? I'd be squirming mess. I admire any ICer who teaches, cause you don't get breaks to pee. My new job would at least allow me to go when I wanted. (it consists of walking into a room and helping teachers with kiddos who kid my criteria.)

            Thanks for the uplifting messages...makes me feel hopeful!
            I.C. DX'd following my "second hysterectomy" (the remaining ovary, that kept bursting and bleeding 2 years after my hyster/right oompherectomy, was removed in 2003. I was a special ed teacher. I am now very lost, and feeling rather hopeless in my life.

            Medications I CURRENTLY take:
            90 mgs Ms contin (45 mgs Am/PM)
            Percocet as needed
            Topomax 100mg day
            Ambien 10 mg bed
            desipramine 25 mgs




            If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed.
            Albert Einstein

            Comment


            • #7
              Wow..Alexa...how do you manage the need to pee? I'd be squirming mess. I admire any ICer who teaches, cause you don't get breaks to pee. My new job would at least allow me to go when I wanted. (it consists of walking into a room and helping teachers with kiddos who kid my criteria.)

              Thanks for the uplifting messages...makes me feel hopeful!
              I.C. DX'd following my "second hysterectomy" (the remaining ovary, that kept bursting and bleeding 2 years after my hyster/right oompherectomy, was removed in 2003. I was a special ed teacher. I am now very lost, and feeling rather hopeless in my life.

              Medications I CURRENTLY take:
              90 mgs Ms contin (45 mgs Am/PM)
              Percocet as needed
              Topomax 100mg day
              Ambien 10 mg bed
              desipramine 25 mgs




              If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed.
              Albert Einstein

              Comment


              • #8
                Alexa,
                What grade do you teach? I love teaching! It's my passion and I'm desperate to get back after my 4 weeks out on med. leave due to a bad flare. I work with struggling readers in first and second grade. Last year I taught first grade when my I.C. kicked into high gear. Luckily there was a bathroom right by my classroom and I could leave my door open and ask another teacher to keep an ear on them while I ran to the bathroom sometimes every 30 min. I taught my kids how to play a quiet game, or read quietly at their desk or continue working while I was out. I rewarded them with a "warm fuzzy" when I returned as long as everyone followed directions. I had a jar that they worked to fill up with pom pom fuzzy things at which time they recieved a reward such as a popcorn party, an afternoon of reading outside under the tree etc. The kids voted on a few options each time so they knew what they were working to earn. I had to come up with something to manage their behaviour during my frequent bathroom visits. The worst was when I hurt so bad and needed to pee but couldn't get it to start. I just broke out into tears on the toilett and that seemed to open the floodgates. My kids knew I was sick, that I had bad days and that I had to go to the hospital. I don't know if many of them actually made the connection that it was because I went to the bathroom a lot. They were a great class and I still feel bad that they didn't get the best of me as a teacher all the time. It was a struggle just to get through each day with the pain and get home to colapse.

                This year as I wrote earlier I was given the position that not only worked out to be more flexible for my I.c. but is also my dream job. I've wanted to get this training and do what I'm doing now since I was in college. I'm getting the experience and the training, which is paid for. I also made sure that I upped my disability insurance and donated days to the sick leave bank. Both of which I'm having to use now. This year I was more prepared with options for sick leave, and while I hate being away from my kids, I needed to give my body a break and a chance to heal. It's worked out well for now but I sometimes worry what might happen if I'm out for a month every year. I will not worry about that at this time. I'm just gratefull to be able to take time off when I need it so I don't have to work in as much pain as I had last year. I hope the pain gets better soon because I must go back next week. I am also happy that most of the time I'm blessed to be working in a field that is helping needy kids get a good start. I love it there's else I could imagine doing that doesn't involve teaching or working with children. In the long run it's us that they teach. I hope you all find the perfect careers when your ready and the flexibility to manage your I.C.

                How many years have you been teaching Alexa? How do you like it?

                I am thankful that I can share with all of you. grouphug

                Rachel

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hello fellow teachers!

                  MakinIt, It can be challenging at times, but I work with a very supportive group of teachers and have a great principal -- it makes a huge difference. And I'm generally feeling good these days. I find that I can hold it in for a couple of hours (usually), so I go right before school starts (8:50), and I can make it until recess (10:20-10:40), then I can make it until lunch (12:00-1:00) and we get dismissed at 3:00 PM. To tell you the truth I think I've trained my body because I go at those times every day and can generally wait until the next break!

                  rachelm, I'm glad you enjoy it so much! I do too I've taught pretty much every grade, but right now I have a grade 6/7. I taught ESL for 3 years, and have been teaching elementary school for 2 years. I love the "warm fuzzy" idea! What a great idea! I do something similar, and I always have short little worksheets or something ready for them to work on just in case I have to run out of the room for a minute to pee, but that doesn't happen very often. I guess it would depend on the class as well -- I remember a few years ago I was in a class where the kids were just off the wall, and I just couldn't hold it in (had some coffee just before class -- dumb!!!)and ran to the bathroom around the corner when they were doing silent reading (literally 2 seconds away from the classroom) and when I came back there were 4 or 5 kids wandering the hallway looking for me!! ahhh!!!!! They were quietly reading when I left!! I'm lucky the principal didn't see them (different school from where I am now). Reading recovery is a great program, I don't know that much about it because I work with older kids, but I've heard great things about that program.

                  Please don't forget I was diagnosed over 7 years ago with IC, and to tell you the truth, I couldn't imagine teaching if I were still feeling like I was when I was first diagnosed (even though everyone's different). I was 20 and in university when I was diagnosed and very sick. I needed to take time off and take care of myself. I tried almost every medication and treatment out there -- and finally found the combination that worked for me (Elmiron, desipramine, IC diet)....only then was I able to go back to school, finish my degrees and teach. I'm doing SOOOO much better now, and am able to successfully work. But please don't forget to take care of yourself first....I hope you both find what works for you very soon...

                  Hugs and love to you both,
                  Alexa
                  My story of healing and hope http://www.ic-network.com/patientstories/alexa.html

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That's a comfort! I was soooo sad and dark for months around here. I had a cloud hovering over my head, and I really get frustrated with other people who get that way so that mad me doubly mad and depressed. I think if it weren't for my children , I would've done myself in. I just couldn't leave them with that burden to bear for their lives. I think when I was so ill in my early 20's (I was paralyzed for a year) it was different because I was clueless how sick I was, was going to get, and how long the recovery was going to be, and what it was going to take, and what the odds were of full recovery. For a long time I just kept assuming I was going home from the hospital the next day...duh, I was on a ventilator for Pete's sake. It wasn't until I started dreaming with myself in a wheelchair that I accepted my situation. (I'm not in a W/C now...I fought my way back out of that little situation) So...I've accepted the situation and realize I can't work full time with those kiddos I truly love (multiply handicapped) but this job opportunity is awesome and can''t be passed up. It's perfect for me.

                    Thanks for the help!!!!
                    I.C. DX'd following my "second hysterectomy" (the remaining ovary, that kept bursting and bleeding 2 years after my hyster/right oompherectomy, was removed in 2003. I was a special ed teacher. I am now very lost, and feeling rather hopeless in my life.

                    Medications I CURRENTLY take:
                    90 mgs Ms contin (45 mgs Am/PM)
                    Percocet as needed
                    Topomax 100mg day
                    Ambien 10 mg bed
                    desipramine 25 mgs




                    If people are good only because they fear punishment, and hope for reward, then we are a sorry lot indeed.
                    Albert Einstein

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      hi makinit,
                      hope everything keeps working in your favor.. please keep us posted
                      Brat
                      'The will of God will never take you where the Grace of God will not protect you.'

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        teaching

                        Hi

                        I am also a teacher but I teach middle school science. I am am fortunate that I usually have an aide in the room with me for my special ed students. They are wonderful if I need to run out. I also have a have a great teacher in the room next to me that I can open the adjoining door and run out if I need to. If all us fails we ALL take a bathroom break. THankfully I can usually hold my bladder for a few hours.

                        Comment

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