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IC after abdominal surgery, worse with any muscle activity?

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  • Josh85
    replied
    Without saying too much before I see how it goes, it's looking like I will be getting a serious of steroid shots in the pelvic area next Thursday. It's the first of 3-4 rounds of shots at two week intervals that I am looking at getting.

    As a reminder, although I do have visible inflammation in my bladder, I'm also extremely sensitive to any use or stretch of the core muscles (via exercise, singing, back-arching, etc.) I saw the surgeon for an exam today, and he found a ton of tenderness around where the ligaments attach into the pubic bones, and the idea is that the series of injections helps to heal them. I

    I don't necessarily expect it to work and I don't want to jinx anything, but he seems to have a decent reputation, seems smart, seems to genuinely care, and has some very interesting theories (with, apparently, fairly high success rates among qualifying patients). He basically views "POPPS" (i.e. pelvic pain) as an evolved form of osteitis pubis, which I actually have shown mild signs of upon MRI for a while. Apparently there are a lot of issues with insurance covering the shots, and while he just accepts whatever they give and doesn't make patients pay the balance, he says this is the main reason more surgeons have no interest in this branch of theory.

    Anyway, I'll try to update this thread with my progress - in the off chance it does help, it could certainly shed some light on a cause of bladder irritation for certain people. I'll be happy to PM more info for any fellow ICers who similarly activity-sensitive symptoms if this does end up helping, but I know posting doctor info on the boards is a dicey situation...

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  • purpleviolet
    replied
    other types of PT

    I wonder if the physical therapy is trigger point therapy, since the pain seems so muscle related. Not all therapists know that much about it, but some do

    One time I went to a naturopath that performed something called visceral manipulations I certain type of pushing tissue around (on the outside, not internally) to address adhesions. I guess I have some but don't seem to affect mu bladder.
    Last edited by purpleviolet; 02-21-2011, 01:33 PM. Reason: spell

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  • Josh85
    replied
    Interesting, here's how the IC wikipedia page describes pain pumps: "very small amounts of medication, like morphine sulfate, dilaudid, or baclophen are released into the cerebrospinal fluid via a catheter stemming from the small electrical pump, requiring only about 1/100 to 1/300 the amount of medication needed orally for the same therapeutic benefit, but with significantly fewer side effects."

    Sounds kind of like something you'd do if you need to take a ton of medicine, but not necessarily something you'd do if your medicine wasn't working.

    ----------

    Anyway, as far as scar tissue referring pain to other parts of the body - I do understand that friction on a nerve can refer pain to an area of the body further down the nerve pathway. However, thanks to the cysto/hydro, I know it's not just "referred pain" in my bladder - the bladder wall is visibly, tangibly inflamed.

    So really, I'm trying to figure out if there's some way that nerves/musculature OUTSIDE of the bladder can be connected and/or contribute to visible inflammation and dysfunction inside the bladder, rather than simply referring pain through a nerve pathway. And if the answer is scar tissue adhesions, whether it is possible for adhesions to form to my bladder even though it was not displaced or very near the surgery site.

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  • Snowden1
    replied
    I was talking with a lady today who now has a pain pump. She said that her doctor told her some people just had more of a tendency to develope scar tissue than others and hers was bad. She had very severe adhesions. They told her that they didn't want to try to remove them, because they thought they would just come back. She tried many things (she didn't have IC) even the interstim to try to help the pain (I thought they only did these for frequency). She said nothing touched her pain until she got the pump. I really worry about this procedure because of my past history with infection. Also, Jill has recently posted how the interestim is a concern for infection. Medtronics make both of these devices and I am not saying it is or isn't a good company, but I would think both the interstim and the pain pump would have the many of the same materials. Infection is a huge concern to me. This lady also said that her pain was constant. She never had a zero pain level. I do have zero pain once in awhile and my pain goes up and down throughout the day. I can be a 2 and then hour later be at a 10, so I don't know how they would regulate this with the pain pump trial. For this lady it was easier because they could gage the medication to her pain level.

    Sorry to go on and on. I am sorry if I went around your question. I think you can have scar tissue somewhere that impacts other areas of your body. For example, I have "frozen shoulder" now and this originates at my shoulder, but I feel it in my neck, chest arm, shoulder and even in my fingertips. (Although, this is not from scar tissue).

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  • Josh85
    replied
    Originally posted by ICNDonna View Post
    When I was first diagnosed with IC (36 years ago!) it was following abdominal surgery. I had such severe abdominal pain that my doctor did an exploratory laparotomy --- and found that I also had severe adhesions from the first surgery. Has your doctor mentioned this as a possibility? I think they use laparoscopic surgery to clip adhesions these days --- back in the 70s, it meant a huge incision.

    By the way, my adhesions did not return.

    Donna
    Hi Donna,

    No... I've actually wondered about that and even asked the surgeon about the possibility, but this was his response: "An inguinal hernia repair -true or sports related - represents subcutaneous surgery, or 'under the skin'. No body cavity is entered. Scar tissue under the skin may be uncomfortable but would not impede the function of any urinary structure." He also said that he did not displace the bladder or anything during surgery, and that he was "nowhere near the bladder."

    So as best I understand it, it seems adhesions can only form in areas where the surgery took place - particularly if any organs needed to be moved aside or "messed with" during the surgery, and it appears that was not the case with my bladder. Does that make sense to you, or do you think it still might be possible?

    Thanks for the input.

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  • Snowden1
    replied
    This may be something I should persue next. Thank you very much for the information. There may be much more going on in there than just IC.

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  • ICNDonna
    replied
    Before I got rid of my adhesions I couldn't even stand up straight. Yes, it definitely helped with my pain. I still had bladder pain, but that was nothing compared to the combination of having most of my abdominal organs stuck together with adhesions --- my surgeon described the adhesions as being like a spider web encompassing my entire abdomen.

    Donna

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  • Snowden1
    replied
    Donna,
    Did your pain get better after you had the removal of the adhesions? I also had a hysterectomy followed by a pelvic infection that needed several rounds of antibiotics. I am wondering if a laporoscopy may help at all with this daily pain. I know my bladder is also an issue, because diet is critical for me. I am very food sensitive. I was told my a uro/gyn that if he did this surgery and removed adhesions they would just come back even worse and I may not even be able to walk. It is interesting that yours did not come back. Now I am rethinking this surgery. Although, the thought of more pain really scares me. But, if there is something else I should be looking at before trying a pain pump or other invasive things, I want to explore it.

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  • ICNDonna
    replied
    When I was first diagnosed with IC (36 years ago!) it was following abdominal surgery. I had such severe abdominal pain that my doctor did an exploratory laparotomy --- and found that I also had severe adhesions from the first surgery. Has your doctor mentioned this as a possibility? I think they use laparoscopic surgery to clip adhesions these days --- back in the 70s, it meant a huge incision.

    By the way, my adhesions did not return.

    Donna

    Leave a comment:


  • Josh85
    replied
    Hrmmmmmmm, I tried going to a restorative yoga class yesterday and even those basic movements aggravated it enough I had trouble falling asleep last night.

    I would almost think it was something other than IC, except the cysto/hydro did show moderate bladder inflammation and the urodynamics test didn't show PFD - only some dysfunction of the actual bladder (i.e. it spasmed a little and the flow was weaker than it should have been, given how hard it was squeezing).

    Has no one else's pain been extremely sensitivity to movement/activity like this? I'm a little perplexed.

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  • sailawaygrl
    replied
    Be sure to give the elmiron time to work, very little gets to our bladders when we ingest the capsules. That is why it is very important not to eat before or right after taking the pills. Some Dr's, mine included are now using them in instills. It can take weeks, months or even up to a year to notice strong improvement with elmiron. I think it took me a year to see dramatic results but looking back I was improving slowly during that time. I see so many people take them for a couple of months and declare they don't work. I woulndn't stop my elmiron now for anything, but I remember thinking it wasn't working for a very long time.

    Your welcome, I hope I helped you. Check out the men's section on here, we have had quite a few men become members lately. They can possibly help you more.
    Sandra

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  • Josh85
    replied
    Oh, gotcha. The pain is often - primarily, even - throughout the urethra rather than just the bladder (through the perineum and penis). No instills yet, but that sounds like something I should explore.

    I'm hoping you're right that by watching my diet and giving my bladder a "band aid", it might just heal some with time. I am a little worried there is something else involved though, due to the uniqueness of some of my aggravating symptoms.

    Anyway, thanks again!

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  • sailawaygrl
    replied
    Not sure how to describe the pulling pain, to me it feels as if it is pulling on both sides above my bladder. I honestly can' t imagine a pain when you talk or breath deeply, that has to terrible. I feel for you. When you mention the scar, perhaps adhesions could be causing some of the pain. You might want to explore that. The pain you feel, and always feel is completely in your bladder? When I said that about time to heal, I was referring to healing as in giving your imflamed bladder time to rest. I would think that following the IC diet should start helping you with the inflamation in your bladder. Have you had any bladder instills? Those help me because I use marcaine and it simply numbs the inside of my bladder.

    I have not seen anyone else post about the type of pain you are having, directly caused from merely talking rapidly. Hopefully someone else will see this and post if they have had a similar experience. I wish you the best of luck. Keep searching, answers have to be out there somewhere.
    Sandra

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  • Josh85
    replied
    Sandra, if you don't mind me asking... by the "pulling pain" with activity you refer to, do you mean that it makes your bladder pain worse, or does it feel more like a separate kind of muscle-type pain?

    For me, it just makes the bladder pain worse.

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  • Josh85
    replied
    Hi, thanks for the reply! Yes, I've been doing PT with several therapists that are very well trained and specialize in pelvic floor issues for 4 months now, without much luck. I think it's hard for them to know what to try, because pretty much any exercise hurts rather than helps, even if it's gradual. Even having a normal-speed/volume conversation and breathing in fully aggravates it when it's bad. However, they've been treating me under the assumption of neuralgia rather than IC... I see one Thursday, so we'll see what she says about the new diagnosis.

    I'm not sure what you mean by time to heal? I didn't attempt any working out or singing for months afterwards, if that's what you mean. The pelvic floor disfunction theory makes sense to me, but a recent biofeedback test suggested I wasn't storing excess tension in my pelvic floor and a recent urodyanmics test suggested my bladder pain/issues weren't associated with any muscle tension and spasming.

    One last thought - the scar from my surgery is still pretty tough with scar tissue, despite me working on it. It's only about a half-inch from the bladder, so I wonder if it could be involved somehow (although the cysto did show visible inflammation in the bladder, so it's not just as simple as referred pain from a pinched nerve).

    Thanks again for the input.

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