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Pelvic Floor Disorder?

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  • NicoleB
    replied
    sometimes i wonder if if have PFD more than IC. i have no frequency, diet really doesnt affect me (i can drink coffee and not feel any different).

    I feel the most pain when my bladder is full, and the pain feels like its at the bottom of the bladder, right at the bladder neck. LIke a bearing down burning pressure. i dont have retention, and i have a full stream, but the pee "hesitates" at first. like, i sit down, try to pee, and it feels like my bladder neck starts painfully spasming, and all my muscles suck upward (unintentionally) then within a few seconds, they relax again, and the pee comes out. Then i'm left with a stabby burning urethra that lasts a few minutes to an hour after i pee. Does that sound like PFD?
    i also have sex pain, but that could be because of the bladder being inflamed, i'm not sure.

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  • rosesitty
    replied
    I just wanted to add that PT doesn't necessarily work for everyone. The first time the therapist pressed on just the external trigger points, it set off the muscles in my back and hip so bad I could barely walk. It's been like that for five months - and I stopped PT three months ago. When she went internal (one time) I had breakthrough bleeding. I know it's PFD, but I'd like to have just the symptoms I had BEFORE the PT. Now I'm stuck with this new crud. So...unfortunately, it's soaking and muscle relaxers for me, until we can figure something else out. My uro, uro/gyno, PT and orthopedic doc are perplexed...how does that me ME feel!!??
    Be well,
    Stephanie

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  • MelissaT
    replied
    Thanks, I will mention all this to my uro. on Wednesday.

    MelissaT

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  • Katrina
    replied
    http://icandme.9.forumer.com/index.php?showtopic=6 pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) learning to relax the muscles treatment options symptoms of PFD and more
    Moisture, heat, cold, learning to relax, stress reduction, physical therapy, muscle relaxants, Yoga, and others I can't think of atm but are at that list. What is important to note though if you see physcial therapist that with PFD relaxing is key and strengthening needs to be secondary especially when you have a contributing condition like IC. Good luck!

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  • MelissaT
    replied
    I know what you mean Cia, I use home instillations and sometimes the medicine wont stay in my bladder. I thought I was doing something wrong. I have to put the meds. in two or three times before it would stay. I don't think I would have ever known about PFD if I hadn't came to this site. I am almost angry that it hasn't been mentioned by any of my drs. I have had a lot of them. Like Leelee said we pay them a lot they should try to keep up on the newest info. I hope you feel better soon

    MelissaT

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  • cia
    replied
    PT before instillations

    Last summer I started with a new Uro. He felt that I would not even be able to hold the rescue instillations he wanted me to have, without PT on my pelvic floor muscles first. I had to have four months of physical therapy before I started instillations. Everything was in lock down. I was leaking. I couldn't do Kegels to stop it. I felt like I smelled even though I was changing pads constantly. I was showering like three times a day to wash it all away. The therapist couldn't believe I could still have intercourse with my muscles like that, It actually seemed to somewhat relax me. I have been in a flare for 15 straight months. I can count two days that I went completely without pain meds, they were during PT. My flare worsened when I got the flu three weeks ago and I am sure all the coughing did a number on my pelvic floor muscles. I have a hydro scheduled for Wednesday and then I will no doubt be back in PT. I have had IC since 1993 and noone, not my Uro, not my Primary care, not my Gyno, ever mentioned how the pelvic floor can get involved to wreak additional havok. I was basically bedridden when my new Uro suggested that there may be muscle involvement, I am so much better now. Maybe they don't want to put ideas in our head. I think it's more likely though that they just don't keep up with the latest info. I can understand my Primary not knowing but for a Uro or a Gyno, they just aren't taking the time to pay attention.

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  • leelee88
    replied
    Melissa,
    You are so right, but I have found that Drs want you to tell them whats wrong then they give you meds..Lol, its like you are dg yourself, but pay the bucks just to see them..
    I to have found more help on this site..I would have been so alone if I would not have stumbled upon the ICN...
    If you need anything just ask

    Leave a comment:


  • MelissaT
    replied
    Thanks leelee, I have gotten more information and help since I have joined this site. I can't tell you how much this helps. I am calling my dr. first thing in the morning. It is almost sad that you have to find things to tell your dr. about. They should at least mention related conditions. I am so grateful that you shared this info.

    MelissaT

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  • leelee88
    replied
    What is PFD

    What is pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD)? This is non-neurogenic, uncoordinated behavior of the pelvic floor musculature. This is not like Parkinson’s or multiple sclerosis. This is a person who has no obvious neurological disease and the muscle function is uncoordinated. normally the bladder sits in a funnel of muscle. When one voids, the muscle of the bladder contracts, thereby forcing out urine. At the same time, the muscles of the pelvic floor, the levator muscles, and the muscles of the GU diaphragm have to relax. That is the normal process of voiding; it is a complex neurological mechanism. When this happens, there is a good stream of urine. In a patient with PFD, the bladder contracts and the muscles open up, but they are in spasm. They are not working properly. They open and urine does come out, but this can lead to disruptive symptoms.

    The symptoms of PFD are similar to IC. A patient with IC typically has pelvic pain, the pain often worsens with bladder filling. They usually have day and nighttime urination, and their symptoms are affected by foods, in many instances. The patients who have PFD have similar complaints with a subtle difference (keep in mind that PFD can coexist with IC): IC should not normally result in a poor urinary flow rate. One exception is that if you are urinating tiny volumes each time, you will never be able to generate a good force of the urine stream. If you still have a poor urinary flow rate, that is suggestive of something else going on. In a male, you have to consider the presence of the prostate gland, which can also be causing problems. The first focus of attention in a male is typically on the prostate as a cause of blockage.

    Constipation can also exist in a patient with PFD. Constipation occurs for the same reasons a patient will have problems with urination; the patient tries to push out the bowel movement, but the muscles around the anus and the pelvic floor muscles are contracting at the same time. The stool sits in the rectal vault.

    There are two different types of complaints regarding intercourse: either there is terrible pain during intercourse because the penis is coming directly into the rigid muscles, or there is discomfort the day later. This is commonly seen in both IC and PFD patients.

    Many patients have the sense of incomplete bladder emptying. They feel like they have to void again as soon as they are finished. Some patients cannot empty their bladder. Usually patients who have just PFD and no significant IC do not have nighttime frequency. They just have frequency during the day. There is also a typical history of straining with urination. It is interesting to see the number of patients who say they don’t strain, yet during testing that is performed, they are straining quite a bit.

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  • leelee88
    replied
    omg I deleted it

    I can be so stupid sometimes..
    I was editting the post about PFD...and I deleted it.. I am reposting it..
    Geesh im glad I had it saved on my word documents..lol
    Sorry..

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  • leelee88
    replied
    No problem Weezer...I wish I would have known more about PFD when I was dg with IC.. But my uro said it did not co exsist with IC..Boy was he wrong, I thought all the retention was coming from IC but from what I have learned PFD is what causes people to have retention..Esp if you have had any kind of surgery that has caused trauma to your pelvic.. Like a cysto/hrdro or DNC or hysterectomy even after child birth your pelvic has trauma...

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  • weezer
    replied
    Rhonda: Thanks for the informative post on PFD - you explained it better than my uro. You hit everything in a nutshell - "Thanks" again.
    Weezer

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  • leelee88
    replied
    Melissa..
    I know that hot baths seem to really help me..
    But what has helped me the most is having my husband rubb my inner thighs below my butt..Sorry to be blunt, but it has really helped.. We also have been researching PFD therapy and have gotten some ideas from that..

    You can ask your Uro to recommend a good physical therapist.

    Leave a comment:


  • MelissaT
    replied
    Thanks, I am almost positive that I have this. Is there anything that will help?

    MelissaT

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  • tigger_gal
    replied
    great post. Ronda said it all

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