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Helpful physical therapy treatment, short-term at least...

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  • Helpful physical therapy treatment, short-term at least...

    My physical therapist has been massaging the muscles near where my sacral and lumbar nerves exit my spinal column. It really provides great relief! I think my muscles are spasmed and are squeezing the nerves that innervate my bladder and urethra. It helps for 1-2 days. Has anyone else tried this?

    Hope and Hugs,
    Laurie10

  • #2
    When I massage the lower part of my back (almost near my butt) that helps with the pain. Is that what you are talking about? It only helps with my pain for about 12-15 minutes at the most.

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    • #3
      Oh wow laurie! Do you know what the massage technique is called, I have pt on the 10th, maybe they can do that for me. I'm very happy it is giving you releif, although it is short lived!

      Erika
      IC diagnosed officially via cysto/urodynamics 1/26/07

      Grade II Endometriosis diagnosed via lap 12/11/07

      "Fall down seven times, Stand up eight."

      "Life is a tragedy for those who feel and a comedy for those who think."

      Current Treatments:
      Interstim Since 5/25/07!
      Birth Control

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      • #4
        Yes, Waterflow, my physical therapist (PT) massages the muscles in the lower part of my back (where it dips in) but also in the area right under where my bra strap goes across my back. He also massages right up next to my spine in these areas. I think that is what helps the most!

        I have tried to do the massage myself at home, but, like you, the relief only last for 15-20 minutes. When he does the massage, he spends 45 minutes to an hour on it. And he can put alot more pressure on the areas, so it's a lot more effective than what I can do reaching behind my back.

        I have tried putting a tennis ball up against the wall and pressing into it to try to duplicate his massage techniques. That works pretty well but it's nothing like he can do.

        Erika, I would ask your PT if he/she knows about "trigger point release massage" and "myofascial release." That is what my PT is doing to my sacral and lumbar areas. I think in different PT departments, they each specialize in different areas, so they may be able to pair you up with a therapist who is the most knowledgeable in that area. My PT has also given me some back stretches to do, and they decrease my urethral pain very briefly (2-3 minutes).

        When my PT started poking around in my back, I was surprised to find that I have some VERY sore muscle spasms back there! And my back never even bothered me, it was my urethral/vulvular/abdominal area! Wierd! My PT refers to the type of pain I am having as "referred" pain.

        I hope this information helps!

        God Bless,
        Laurie

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        • #5
          I go to PT on Tuesday and will talk to her about it. Did he give you a time table on how long you will have to have it done? I was told medicaid will only pay for PT for so long so I will have to ask her how much it would cost if I paid for it myself. I know that with anything that helps the IC it is for life. Did he show you a way to do it yourself? Doubt I could do the tennis ball against the wall without falling flat on my butt. What kind of stretches if you don't mind me asking.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the response! It was prescribed by my uro to have trigger point release as well as mayofacial(sp) massage and joint work. Thanks agian! I'm excited for my appt now, to get some releif!

            Erika
            IC diagnosed officially via cysto/urodynamics 1/26/07

            Grade II Endometriosis diagnosed via lap 12/11/07

            "Fall down seven times, Stand up eight."

            "Life is a tragedy for those who feel and a comedy for those who think."

            Current Treatments:
            Interstim Since 5/25/07!
            Birth Control

            Comment


            • #7
              In response to your questions, Waterflow, my PT said that it usually takes 6 weeks for back injuries to heal, but he has never encountered anyone with my kind of problems. So he is kind of doing this experimentally, treating the symptoms. What he is doing seems to be working, so I guess we'll keep it up.

              If back muscle massage does end up working for you, I think that if you have access to a home TENS unit, you could probabaly see your PT 2 times a week and keep the symptoms "in check" using the TENS unit. Of course, it is ultimately up to you, your PT, and your doctor.

              The stretches that my PT gave me are difficult to describe. I'll give you the names of how I describe them and maybe your PT can fill in the blanks and take it from there. I hold each stretch for 10-30 seconds. My names for the stretches are as follow:
              *back hyperextension straight back
              *back hyperextension to the left
              *back hyperextension to the right
              *back flexion reaching right hand to left knee while keeping knees straight *back flexion reaching left hand to right knee while keeping knees straight *maintain lumbar arch while performing back flexion and stretching arms out over a counter-top height surface while keeping knees straight

              Erika, I'm so excited for you and am looking forward to hearing how your appointment goes. Please keep me updated.

              Have a great day!

              Laurie

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