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Catheter inserted daily or at night with a collection bag on them?

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  • jen74
    replied
    I would be very leary of this due to the infection risk. I use to do the bladder instillations and they did help some with the pain, but I ended up with way too many UTI's, one that lasted over 5 months, I could not get rid of it. That was the end of my cathing days. I will not let anyone Catheterize me unless it is an emergency like if I cannot pee, or if I need to have a 8 hour surgery or something. Other than that, NO WAY!! When you have had to live with a UTI for 5 months that wont go away due to being cathed, you learn to be reserved about what you let doctors do to ya. That is just me though.

    Jen

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  • Daisy Mae
    replied
    I just got out of the hospital a few days ago and had been in for nearly 2 weeks. I was in for multiple problems, flare ups of several autoimmune disorders tend to hit me all at one time. While I was there I received a lot of pain medications and steroids which I believe helped break the pain/inflammation cycle. I also had a foley in for a week and a half. Sometimes that can be irritating, cause risk for infection, and can lead to more spasms, but I did really well. Just allowing my bladder to "rest" for a while really made a difference. I wouldn't say I'm in remission, it's a bit early for that and I had some pretty bad spasms and irritation this morning, but overall my bladder does seem better.
    I wouldn't recommend it for long-term though because the risk for infection is just not worth it. Mine stayed in that whole week and a half, which is better than d/c'ing it and reinserting it on a daily basis.
    When Bob mentioned how far it has to go in, he is speaking of males. Men we expect at least 8" insertion because of where it has to go. Women are typically just a couple of inches. Another thing with men is that we often meet resistance in cathing because of enlarged prostate. When I first became a nurse yrs ago I learned to elevate the head of their bed to bring them to an almost-sitting up position. It somehow moves the prostate to enough of a different position in order to allow the catheter to pass through.
    Most urologists probably won't recommend doing an indwelling catheter but every patient is different so all you can do is ask your doctor and find out if it's the right option for you.

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  • melanie626
    replied
    Catheter

    So yes, it is a foley. So I don't think a Uro is going to let you cath yourself before bed and then take it out b/c the risk of infection is high. You can try bladder installations with lidocaine/bicarb and Heparin which I do nightly to help me fall asleep with my ambien and then I only get up a few x a night. I am also trying a super pubic catheter for a trial to see if my bladder is ready to come out. I know how horrible the nocturia is....what else have you tried?

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  • ICNDonna
    replied
    I don't know if there are re-usable foley catheters available. The balloon can also be emptied using a syringe. You might want to discuss this with your doctor.

    Donna

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  • bobspez
    replied
    I had a foley catheter inserted for three weeks following a prostate procedure. It lets you sleep wonderfully as you have no sensation that you are peeing. I had a 500 ml bag and had to empty it a couple of times a night. I was able to wake up briefly to check how full the bag felt. They also have larger bags (1000ml and even 2000ml) for bedside use, but the 500ml bag is as large as you would want to carry around strapped to your leg in the day.

    I have never heard of anyone using a foley repeatedly on just a nightly basis. I think it might cause problems if used repeatedly, long term. Also, a foley costs about $12, and they are not reusable, as you deflate the balloon that holds it inside your bladder, by cutting off the tube stopper. It takes a bit of nerve to do it the first time yourself as the path to the bladder is about 12 or so inches and you have to push the tube in past the opening of the bladder and then inflate the small balloon that anchors the foley in your bladder, with a plastic syringe of distilled water.

    I guess if you were in desperate need of sleep it could be a last resort solution.


    Originally posted by needsrelief View Post
    Ok my IC is getting worst as time goes by. The nocturia is just awefull. I rarely sleep. I heard of an in-law having major bladder problem and requiring a catheter with a collection bag attached to her ankle to go about her daily duties (employment leisure). Im wondering if anyone heard of this or uses one. My particular problem is a night. I dont know what the item is called but I was wondering if uro's let IC patients with severe nocturia sleep with a catheter inside them at night with a collection bad on them to avoid having to get up and urinate?-thanks

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  • nottoc4
    replied
    I think that's called a Foley and I had one in for a few days with my open heart surgery and then for 10 days when I was hospitalized with pneumonia
    and a collapsed lung 2 weeks after surgery.
    To my surprise,my bladder handled that with no problems.

    Leave a comment:


  • Catheter inserted daily or at night with a collection bag on them?

    Ok my IC is getting worst as time goes by. The nocturia is just awefull. I rarely sleep. I heard of an in-law having major bladder problem and requiring a catheter with a collection bag attached to her ankle to go about her daily duties (employment leisure). Im wondering if anyone heard of this or uses one. My particular problem is a night. I dont know what the item is called but I was wondering if uro's let IC patients with severe nocturia sleep with a catheter inside them at night with a collection bad on them to avoid having to get up and urinate?-thanks
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